Grandma’s Crescent Cookies

Growing up my grandmother used to make these deliciously buttery and crumbly crescent cookies around the winter holidays, when the days reached their darkest. They were a favorite Christmastime treat of mine, but since I had to change my diet, I wasn’t able to enjoy them anymore. This year, I created a grain-free version that rivals the originals, crumbles and all!

While this recipe does use butter (I’m working on developing a vegan version), I replaced the white sugar and powdered sugar with monk fruit, a sugar-free fruit sweetener, to keep it paleo (you can also use coconut sugar). Hope you enjoy these delectable cookies this holiday!

Snickerdoodle Cookies (Vegan, Grain-free)

There is a lot to love about these cookies starting with the fact that they are super light and chewy. They’re also vegan, grain-free, and oil-free. They aren’t considered paleo because I use white sugar to maintain their pale color, but substituting for coconut sugar will do the trick. I often make them when I’m dying for a sweet fix after dinner but don’t have a lot of time to make something time-intensive because they are super easy to whip up.

Springerle (Anise) Cookies

I recently read a wonderfully interesting book about the plants, spirits, and rituals at the origins of Yuletide, or Christmas. In it, I was introduced to a host of Christmas traditions and foods, most of which originated in Scandinavia, Germany, and other surrounding countries. One such recipe was Springerle cookies, German anise cookies, which are made during the Christmas week. While these cookies are typically made with wheat flour, powdered sugar, and embossed with various designs using wooden molds, I have Paleo-fied the recipe and used cookie cutters instead. For those of us unable to eat the traditional version, these anise cookies will certainly lighten up your heart and home this Christmastime!

Scoop-n-Bake Cookies

These cookies hit every diet category and the easiest cookie recipe I’ve ever created. Playing off the break-n-bake cookies you can buy at the store, these are scoop-n-bake: they only take 10 minutes to whip up and another 10 to bake! I often make these cookies when I’m dying for a sweet fix after dinner but don’t have a lot of time to make something time-intensive. This recipe includes chocolate chips, but you could replace the chocolate chips with chopped nuts or raisins. Try them out and let me know what you think! 

Chocolate Pecan Cookies

When I started baking using alternative ingredients to wheat flour several years ago, cookies (and pancakes) were the hardest for me to figure out. They seemed so finicky. I had difficulty getting the correct consistency and texture. Thankfully, I’ve figured them both out! This is one of my favorite cookie recipes. You probably noticed from many of my recipes that I’m a huge chocolate fan (and who isn’t?!), so not surprisingly, these cookies are about as chocolatey as it gets! Enjoy!

Muesli Health Rusks

Rusks were one of the first tasty treats I was introduced to in South Africa. The impossibly hard, crunchy and crumbly, sweet little cookie-like biscuits, similar to biscotti, paired beautifully with rooibos tea or coffee and softened when dunked. I sure ate my fill of them! While buttermilk rusks are the standard version, you can find all different types of rusks in the stores. My favorites were muesli, or heath, rusks since they had nuts, seeds, and dried fruit in them. During my time in South Africa, I began to deal with GI issues. It eventually meant that traditional wheat rusks were off the table. After returning from South Africa I was determined to create a grain-free, dairy-free “muesli” version, so I could still enjoy them in the mornings with my tea or coffee. So here is my version!

Gingerbread Cookies

Growing up, gingerbread and gingersnap cookies were my favorite Christmas treats! This year, I finally attempted my own and I’m pleased to say the first cookie batch exceeded my expectations. In fact, the photos shown here are taken of that first batch!